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The LDS Daily WOOL© Archive - Charity



(11/23/97)
"It may be of some significance to note that the word charity does not appear in a single verse in the Old Testament. Surely the prophets of ancient times understood the need for charity as did the Apostle Paul and the prophets of ancient America. And surely those prophets knew and taught that 'charity is the pure love of Christ' (Moroni 7:47). We are left to wonder if the enemies of Christ deliberately removed from the holy writings these saving truths as part of the plain and precious teachings that Nephi prophetically said would be removed (see I Nephi 13:20-29). Also, charity is only partially explained in the New Testament. But thankfully the Book of Mormon, another witness for Christ, has restored to us an understanding of this eternal precept. I testify that as we abide by this precept, we will draw nearer to God. Indeed, we will become more like him."—Elder C. Max Caldwell, Love Of Christ, General Conference, October 1992


(11/24/97)
"What is charity? Does it consist solely in the giving of bread to the hungry, clothes to the naked or succor to the distressed? 'Though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up; doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth; beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Charity never faileth.' (I. Cor. 13: 3-8.) If to say that one has charity to any considerable extent requires the possession of all the foregoing characteristics, then we may truthfully admit that there is a great charity famine now prevailing throughout the world."—Matthias F. Cowley, Cowley's Talks on Doctrine, p.165


(11/25/97)
"The Apostle Paul taught that three divine principles form a foundation upon which we can build the structure of our lives. They are faith, hope, and charity. (See I Corinthians 13:13.) Together they give us a base of support like the legs of a three-legged stool. Each principle is significant within itself, but each also plays an important supporting role. Each is incomplete without the others. Hope helps faith develop. Likewise, true faith gives birth to hope. When we begin to lose hope, we are faltering also in our measure of faith. The principles of faith and hope working together must be accompanied by charity, which is the greatest of all. According to Mormon, 'charity is the pure love of Christ, and it endureth forever' (Moroni 7:47). It is the perfect manifestation of our faith and hope."—Elder M. Russell Ballard, "The Joy Of Hope Fulfilled", General Conference, October 1992


(11/26/97)
"The world in which we live, whether close to home or far away, needs the gospel of Jesus Christ. It provides the only way the world will ever know peace. We need to be kinder with one another, more gentle and forgiving. We need to be slower to anger and more prompt to help. We need to extend the hand of friendship and resist the hand of retribution. In short, we need to love one another with the pure love of Christ, with genuine charity and compassion and, if necessary, shared suffering, for that is the way God loves us."—President Howard W. Hunter, "A More Excellent Way", General Conference, April 1992


(11/27/97)
"'A new commandment I give unto you,' he said, 'That ye love one another; . . . By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another' (John 13:34-35). This love that we should have for our brothers and sisters in the human family, and that Christ has for every one of us, is called charity or 'the pure love of Christ' (Moroni 7:47). It is the love that prompted the suffering and sacrifice of Christ's atonement. It is the highest pinnacle the human soul can reach and the deepest expression of the human heart."—President Howard W. Hunter, "A More Excellent Way", General Conference, April 1992


(11/28/97)
"The final and crowning virtue of the divine character is charity, or the pure love of Christ (see Moroni 7:47). If we would truly seek to be more like our Savior and Master, learning to love as He loves should be our highest goal. Mormon called charity 'the greatest of all' (Moroni 7:46)."—Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson, p.275


(11/29/97)
"As we grow 'in process of time,' neighbors will suffer less and less at our hands. Then one will naturally esteem his neighbor as himself, because he understands who his neighbor really is. Each step toward single-mindedness in our worship of God squeezes out some of our selfishness, for so much of the overcoming of this world consists of overcoming selfishness. After all, which neighbor fares better—the one who lives by him who is filled with love, patience, and hope, or the one who lives by him who is selfish, impatient, and despairing? With increasing charity, then, our service to others will be an unforced thing it will be a thing from inside, not from outside! Even the good we then do will be done for the right reasons and 'not to please ourselves.' (Romans 15:1.)"—Neal A. Maxwell, Notwithstanding My Weakness, p.29


(10/26/98)
"Only a few men on the earth understand the charity that fills the bosom of our Savior. We should have charity; we should do all we can to reclaim the lost sons and daughters of Adam and Eve, and bring them back to be saved in the presence of our Father and God. If we do this, our charity will extend to the utmost extent that it is designed for the charity of God to extend in the midst of this people." — Brigham Young, "Journal of Discourses", 8:175


(10/27/98)
"This love that we should have for our brothers and sisters in the human family, and that Christ has for every one of us, is called charity or 'the pure love of Christ' (Moro. 7:47). It is the love that prompted the suffering and sacrifice of Christ's atonement. It is the highest pinnacle the human soul can reach and the deepest expression of the human heart." — Howard W. Hunter, General Conference, April 1992


(10/28/98)
"Only by suspending judgment do we exhibit real charity. It is hard to understand why we are ready to condemn our neighbors and our friends on circumstantial evidence while we are all so determined to see that every criminal has a fair and open trial. Surely we can try to eliminate pride, passion, personal feeling, prejudice, and pettiness from our minds, and show charity to those around us." — N. Eldon Tanner, "Judge Not That Ye Be Not Judged," General Conference, April 1972


(10/29/98)
"Brothers and sisters, of all the places where our charitable acts should shine forth, where our discipleship must rise above the weaknesses of self, the family is the most important place. There is no other setting that comes close in comparison. Yet many--far too many--are more charitable to others than to their own." — H. Burke Peterson, "Our Responsibility to Care for Our Own," General Conference, April 1981


(10/30/98)
"Just as doubt, despair, and desensitization go together, so do faith, hope, and charity. The latter, however, must be carefully and constantly nurtured, whereas despair, like dandelions, needs so little encouragement to sprout and spread. Despair comes so naturally to the natural man!" — Neal A. Maxwell, "Brightness Of Hope," General Conference, October 1994


(4/26/01)
"In this modern world plagued with counterfeits for the Lord’s plan, we must not be misled into supposing that we can discharge our obligations to the poor and the needy by shifting the responsibility to some governmental or other public agency. Only by voluntarily giving out of an abundant love for our neighbors can we develop that charity characterized by Mormon as 'the pure love of Christ.' (Moro. 7:47.) This we must develop if we would obtain eternal life." — Marion G. Romney, "Caring for the Poor and Needy," Ensign, Jan. 1973, p. 98


(4/27/01)
"The Prophet Joseph Smith taught that 'friendship is one of the grand fundamental principles of Mormonism.' That thought ought to inspire and motivate all of us because I feel that friendship is a fundamental need of our world. I think in all of us there is a profound longing for friendship, a deep yearning for the satisfaction and security that close and lasting relationships can give. Perhaps one reason the scriptures make little specific mention of the principle of friendship is because it should be manifest quite naturally as we live the gospel. In fact, if the consummate Christian attribute of charity has a first cousin, it is friendship. To paraphrase the Apostle Paul slightly, friendship 'suffereth long, and is kind; [friendship] envieth not;... seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;... [friendship] never faileth.'" — Marlin K. Jensen, "Friendship: A Gospel Principle," Ensign, May 1999, p. 64


(4/28/01)
"Practice the pure religion mentioned by the Apostle James, which is 'to visit the fatherless and widows.' (James 1:27.) Be kind and considerate of all members. Be thoughtful. Be careful in what you say. Don’t allow an insensitive remark or action to harm another. 'And above all things, clothe yourselves with the bond of charity, as with a mantle, which is the bond of perfectness and peace.' (D&C 88:125.)" — Howard W. Hunter, "The Church Is for All People," Ensign, June 1989, p. 77


(4/29/01)
"There is an eternal significance to why the Church is just the facilitator for the members in matters of providing for the poor and needy. There are two basic goals accomplished when we fulfill the commandment to care for the poor. The most obvious is the relief of suffering or the lifting of the spirit of the person to whom the service is given. The second is more subtle but is of eternal consequence. It has to do with the sanctification of the giver. President Marion G. Romney said, 'Living the law of consecration exalts the poor and humbles the rich. In the process, both are sanctified. The poor, released from the bondage and humiliating limitations of poverty, are enabled as free men to rise to their full potential, both temporally and spiritually. The rich, by consecration and the imparting of their surplus for the benefit of the poor, not by constraint, but willingly as an act of free will, evidence that charity for their fellowmen characterized by Mormon as `the pure love of Christ.` (Moro. 7:47.) This will bring both the giver and receiver to the common ground on which the Spirit of God can meet them.' (Ensign, Nov. 1981, p. 93.)" — Glenn L. Pace, "Infinite Needs and Finite Resources," Ensign, June 1993, p. 53


(4/30/01)
"What does it mean to be charitable? Charity is the opposite of selfishness. It means being generous and giving of both one’s means and one’s time in the service of others." — W. Eugene Hansen, "Love," Ensign, Nov. 1989, p. 24


(3/1/04)
"The world in which we live would benefit greatly if men and women everywhere would exercise the pure love of Christ, which is kind, meek, and lowly. It is without envy or pride. It is selfless because it seeks nothing in return. It does not countenance evil or ill will, nor rejoice in iniquity; it has no place for bigotry, hatred, or violence. It refuses to condone ridicule, vulgarity, abuse, or ostracism. It encourages diverse people to live together in Christian love regardless of religious belief, race, nationality, financial standing, education, or culture." - Howard W. Hunter, "A More Excellent Way," Ensign, May 1992, pp. 61-62


(6/6/04)
"Charity is not just works or gift giving, but a condition of the soul, a quality of our character. The gift of charity flows from God as He reveals His love for us, and from our reciprocating-feeling love for God, His work, and His children. That is why Alma could prophesy, 'And see that ye have faith, hope, and charity, and then ye will always abound in good works' (Alma 7:24). Pride is the opposite of charity. Selfishness, indifference, and indolence are enemies of charity." - V. Dallas Merrell, "A Vision of Service," Ensign, December 1996, p. 10


(6/13/04)
"Alma emphasized the importance of 'having the love of God always in your hearts' (Alma 13:29). Charity is that love. Charity is a gift of the Spirit, for 'all things which are good cometh of God' (Moro. 7:12). And this gift is multiplied as it is used." - Elaine L. Jack, "Strengthened in Charity," Ensign, November 1996, p. 92


(8/24/05)
"Life has its share of some fear and some failure. Sometimes things fall short, don't quite measure up. Sometimes in both personal and public life, we are seemingly left without strength to go on. Sometimes people fail us, or economies and circumstance fail us, and life with its hardship and heartache can leave us feeling very alone.

"But when such difficult moments come to us, I testify that there is one thing which will never, ever fail us. One thing alone will stand the test of all time, of all tribulation, all trouble, and all transgression. One thing only never faileth—and that is the pure love of Christ." - Jeffrey R. Holland, "He Loved Them unto the End," Ensign, Nov. 1989, 26



11/18/05
"Would you have your children grow in a spirit of unselfishness? Indulgence of selfish desires will not do it. Rather, let them come to see in their own homes, and in their most intimate family associations, the truth of the great principle set forth by the Lord: 'Whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel's, the same shall save it.' (Mark 8:35.)" - Gordon B. Hinckley, "Faith: The Essence of True Religion," p.67


1/13/06
"Out of the abundance of his heart, Jesus spoke to the poor, the downtrodden, the widows, the little children; to farmers and fishermen, and those who tended goats and sheep; to strangers and foreigners, the rich, the politically powerful, as well as the unfriendly Pharisees and scribes. He ministered to the poor, the hungry, the deprived, the sick. He blessed the lame, the blind, the deaf, and other people with physical disabilities. He drove out the demons and evil spirits that had caused mental or emotional illness. He purified those who were burdened with sin. He taught lessons of love and repeatedly demonstrated unselfish service to others. All were recipients of his love. All were 'privileged the one like unto the other, and none [were] forbidden.' (2 Ne. 26:28.) These are all expressions and examples of his unbounded charity.

"The world in which we live would benefit greatly if men and women everywhere would exercise the pure love of Christ, which is kind, meek, and lowly. It is without envy or pride. It is selfless because it seeks nothing in return. It does not countenance evil or ill will, nor rejoice in iniquity; it has no place for bigotry, hatred, or violence. It refuses to condone ridicule, vulgarity, abuse, or ostracism. It encourages diverse people to live together in Christian love regardless of religious belief, race, nationality, financial standing, education, or culture." - Howard W. Hunter, "A More Excellent Way," Ensign (CR), May 1992, p.61


1/30/06
"Just as doubt, despair, and desensitization go together, so do faith, hope, and charity. The latter, however, must be carefully and constantly nurtured, whereas despair, like dandelions, needs so little encouragement to sprout and spread. Despair comes so naturally to the natural man!" - Neal A. Maxwell, "Brightness of Hope," Ensign (CR), November 1994, p.34


3/16/06
"Having watched a dispensation die and an entire civilization destroy itself, Moroni quotes his father for any who will listen in some later ("latter") day, 'If ye have not charity, ye are nothing.' (Moro. 7:46.) Only the pure love of Christ will see us through. It is Christ's love which suffereth long, and is kind. It is Christ's love which is not puffed up nor easily provoked. Only his pure love enables him—and us—to bear all things, believe all things, hope all things, and endure all things. (See Moro. 7:45.)" - Jeffrey R. Holland, "He Loved Them unto the End," Ensign (CR), November 1989, p.25


3/17/06
"Nothing will bring the Spirit of the Lord into your meetings, your homes, and your personal associations more quickly than showing kindness. 'Charity... is kind' (1 Cor. 13:4). Kindness should be right at the top of everyone's list of things to do. Write it down every day: 'Be kind.' Kindness comes in many different packages. Be thoughtful to your neighbors. Be patient in a crowd. Be considerate of your children and your husband. Be honest with your sisters. Trust them and they will trust you.... As we increase our kindness, we add charity to our storehouse and we are strengthened." - Elaine L. Jack, "Strengthened in Charity," Ensign (CR), November 1996, p.91


3/28/06
"We are challenged to move through a process of conversion toward that status and condition called eternal life. This is achieved not just by doing what is right, but by doing it for the right reason—for the pure love of Christ. The Apostle Paul illustrated this in his famous teaching about the importance of charity (see 1 Cor. 13). The reason charity never fails and the reason charity is greater than even the most significant acts of goodness he cited is that charity, 'the pure love of Christ' (Moro. 7:47), is not an act but a condition or state of being. Charity is attained through a succession of acts that result in a conversion. Charity is something one becomes. Thus, as Moroni declared, 'except men shall have charity they cannot inherit' the place prepared for them in the mansions of the Father (Ether 12:34)." - Dallin H. Oaks, "The Challenge to Become," Ensign (CR), November 2000, p.32


6/24/06
"We have been taught in other scripture that no matter how great and significant our mortal accomplishments, no matter how much was accomplished under our hand—as a bishop, a clerk, a president, a teacher, or a parent—unless we learn to exhibit charity, we are nothing. (See 1 Cor. 13:1-3.) All our good deeds will not weigh in our favor if charity is lacking." - H. Burke Peterson, "Our Responsibility to Care for Our Own," Ensign (CR), May 1981, p.81


10/1/06
"For Relief Society, the charity of our motto is not an abstraction. It is a love beyond the emotion we might feel for or from others. It isn't a 'what's in it for me?' kind of love. Being friendly, generous, and respectful of others moves us along the way from self-concern, but the selflessness of the kind of love that Christ commanded us to learn is a high step indeed. 'Bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them who despitefully use you' (3 Ne. 12:44). He promises that as we learn that kind of love, we can become perfect!" - Aileen H. Clyde, "Relief Society: Charity, the Guiding Principle," Ensign (CR), November 1993, p.92


11/30/06
"I desire to second the resolution offered by President Winder to this conference; and in doing so I desire to call attention to the fact that we are connected with an institution founded of God for the benefit of the whole world, and that it is an institution of world-wide sympathies; that it is an institution whose doctrines recognize the great truth that the children of men are also the children of God, and that all men are brethren. No calamity can fall upon any of our Father's children but what our hearts go out in sympathy to them. I trust also that this movement, which I believe will be unanimously endorsed by this conference, may bear witness to the wisdom that exists in our methods of collecting means for charitable and religious purposes. Thank God, there is an institution in the earth whose charities are constantly accumulating, that in the very moment of need there is a means of ministering unto the children of men-a circumstance that speaks loudly for the divine wisdom that has made these provisions in the Church of Christ." - Brigham H. Roberts, "Conference Report," April 1907, p.59


2/24/07
"Stated simply, charity means subordinating our interests and needs to those of others, as the Savior has done for all of us. The Apostle Paul wrote that of faith, hope, and charity, 'the greatest of these is charity' (1 Cor. 13:13), and Moroni wrote that 'except ye have charity ye can in nowise be saved in the kingdom of God' (Moro. 10:21). I believe that selfless service is a distinctive part of the gospel. As President Spencer W. Kimball said, welfare service 'is not a program, but the essence of the gospel. It is the gospel in action.'" - Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Fruits of the Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ," Ensign (CR), November 1991, p.15


4/17/08
"Brothers and sisters, if only we had more compassion for those who are different from us, it would lighten many of the problems and sorrows in the world today. It would certainly make our families and the Church a more hallowed and heavenly place." - Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Concern for the One," General Conference, April 2008


2/7/09
"Faith, hope, and charity complement each other, and as one increases, the others grow as well. Hope comes of faith, for without faith, there is no hope. In like manner faith comes of hope, for faith is 'the substance of things hoped for.'

"Hope is critical to both faith and charity. When disobedience, disappointment, and procrastination erode faith, hope is there to uphold our faith. When frustration and impatience challenge charity, hope braces our resolve and urges us to care for our fellowmen even without expectation of reward. The brighter our hope, the greater our faith. The stronger our hope, the purer our charity.

"The things we hope for lead us to faith, while the things we hope in lead us to charity. The three qualities—faith, hope, and charity—working together, grounded on the truth and light of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, lead us to abound in good works." - Dieter F. Uchtdorf, "The Infinite Power of Hope," (CR) October 2008


2/8/09
"Now, understanding charity or being charitable is not easy. And our scriptures have not indicated that it would be. Even 'charity suffereth long' requires our thoughtful interpretation. The 'suffering' that may come from loving is the result of our great caring. It comes because another matters to us so much.

"To avoid that kind of suffering, we would have to avoid what gives us life and hope and joy—our capacity to love deeply. As an antidote against the suffering that will surely come as we have loved ones die, or see them struggle or be misled, or have them misunderstand us or even betray us, we can find relief in charity to others. We accepted bearing one another's burdens and mourning with those who mourn, as we accepted Christ in our baptism. (See Mosiah 18:8-9.) His spirit and power will comfort us as we extend ourselves in help and love to those who need us." - Aileen H. Clyde, "Charity Suffereth Long", Ensign (CR), November 1991, p.76


4/14/09
“Can our prayers ascend to the throne of mercy and be heard and answered, as we humbly desire, unless we practice charity in our lives? Must we not give of ourselves and of our means in helping others? Good intentions alone are not enough. Charity is not a virtue to expect in others only. It is the all-important Christian attribute to be found in ourselves.” - Henry D. Moyle, “Conference Report,” April 1948, p.3


7/26/11
In the Church we have many opportunities to perform charitable acts. Some of the greatest acts of charity begin with an outstretched hand of friendship. - Adney Y. Komatsu, "The Light of the Gospel," Ensign (CR) October 1981


8/9/11
Moroni taught that “charity is the pure love of Christ.” (Moro. 7:47.) It was the suffering Redeemer who said, as he hung on Calvary’s cross and looked down upon those who had so brutally crucified him, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.” (Luke 23:34.)
 
If there be any within the sound of my voice who have harbored grudges, who have let hatred develop in their hearts one toward another, I ask you to make the effort to turn around. Hatred always fails and bitterness always destroys, but “charity never faileth.” (1 Cor. 13:8.) - Gordon B. Hinckley, "Charity Never Faileth," Ensign (CR) October 1981


12/12/12
There is need of that kind of charity that gives hope to those who are unnoticed, those who are discouraged, and the afflicted. There is need of charity that can instil into the hearts of those who have made mistakes the desire to repent and to seek forgiveness of those against whom they mad have done wrong. After all, true charity is love in action. And it seems to me that the need of charity, like the need of God, is everywhere. - Elray L. Christiansen, Conference Report, April 1956, Afternoon Meeting, p.114


2/6/13
There is so much incivility in the world today. Because of the anonymity of the Internet, it is easier than ever to say toxic or grating things online. Shouldn’t we, the hopeful disciples of our gentle Christ, have a higher, more charitable standard? The scriptures teach, “Let your speech be alway[s] with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man” (Colossians 4:6).

I like the idea of our words being clear as a sunny sky and full of grace. Can you imagine what our families, wards, nations, and even the world would be like if we could adopt this simple principle? - Dieter F. Uchtdorf, "A Word for the Hesitant Missionary," Ensign, February 2013


8/29/13
“A new commandment I give unto you,” he said, “That ye love one another; … By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.” (John 13:34–35.) This love that we should have for our brothers and sisters in the human family, and that Christ has for every one of us, is called charity or “the pure love of Christ.” (Moro. 7:47.) It is the love that prompted the suffering and sacrifice of Christ’s atonement. It is the highest pinnacle the human soul can reach and the deepest expression of the human heart. - Howard W. Hunter, "A More Excellent Way," Ensign (CR) May 1992


8/31/13
An understanding, loving heart is the pinnacle of all human emotions. As the Apostle Paul said, charity “beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.” (1 Cor. 13:7.) We come closest to becoming Christlike when we are charitable and understanding of others. -
Marvin J. Ashton, "The Measure of Our Hearts," Ensign (CR) November 1988


9/15/13
As we do what He would have us do for His Father’s children, the Lord considers it kindness to Him, and we will feel closer to Him as we feel His love and His approval. In time we will become like Him and will think of the Judgment Day with happy anticipation. - Henry B. Eyring, "Where is the Pavilion?" Ensign (CR) November 2012


5/30/14
In a hundred small ways, all of you wear the mantle of charity. Life is perfect for none of us. Rather than being judgmental and critical of each other, may we have the pure love of Christ for our fellow travelers in this journey through life. May we recognize that each one is doing her best to deal with the challenges which come her way, and may we strive to do our best to help out. - Thomas S. Monson, “Charity Never Faileth,” Ensign (CR) November 2010


2/10/15
Our personal journey through life provides us with many special experiences that become building blocks of faith and testimony. These experiences come to us in vastly different ways and at unpredictable times. They can be powerful spiritual events or small enlightening moments. Some experiences will come as serious challenges and heavy trials that test our ability to cope with them. No matter what the experience may be, each gives us a chance for personal growth, greater wisdom, and, in many cases, service to others with more empathy and love. As the Lord stated to the Prophet Joseph Smith in a reassuring way during one of his most significant trials at Liberty Jail, “All these things shall give thee experience, and shall be for thy good” (D&C 122:7). - Ronald A. Rasband, “Special Experiences,” Ensign (CR) April 2008


3/24/15
And as we go forward, may we bless humanity with an outreach to all, lifting those who are downtrodden and oppressed, feeding and clothing the hungry and the needy, extending love and neighborliness to those about us who may not be part of this Church. The Lord has shown us the way. He has given us His word, His counsel, His guidance, yea, His commandments. We have done well. We have much to be grateful for and much to be proud of. But we can do better, so much better. - Gordon B. Hinckley, "Living in the Fulness of Times," Ensign (CR), November 2001, p.4


4/7/15
When we offer succor to anyone, the Savior feels it as if we reached out to succor Him. - Henry B. Eyring, “Is Not This the Fast That I Have Chosen?” Ensign (CR) April 2015


7/5/15
Perhaps the greatest charity comes when we are kind to each other, when we don't judge or categorize someone else, when we simply give each other the benefit of the doubt or remain quiet. Charity is accepting someone's differences, weaknesses, and shortcomings; having patience with someone who has let us down; or resisting the impulse to become offended when someone doesn't handle something the way we might have hoped. Charity is refusing to take advantage of another's weakness and being willing to forgive someone who has hurt us. Charity is expecting the best of each other. - Marvin J. Ashton, "The Tongue Can Be a Sharp Sword," Ensign (CR), May 1992, p. 18


11/2/15
Only when we see through Heavenly Father’s eyes can we be filled with “the pure love of Christ.” Every day we should plead with God for this love. Mormon admonished, “Wherefore, my beloved brethren, pray unto the Father with all the energy of heart, that ye may be filled with this love, which he hath bestowed upon all who are true followers of his Son, Jesus Christ.” - Dale G. Renlund, “Through God’s Eyes,” Ensign (CR) November 2015


1/25/16
Do you, at this time, have unkind feelings or less than love in your heart for a friend, a neighbor, or any of God's children? Try doing something extra nice for that person, and keep it up until all the bitterness has gone from your heart. - Eldred G. Smith, “Peace," Ensign (CR), July 1972, p.117


5/2/16
The Lord has instructed us that the stakes of Zion are to be “a defense” and “a refuge from the storm.” We have found refuge. Let us come out from our safe places and share with them, from our abundance, hope for a brighter future, faith in God and in our fellowman, and love that sees beyond cultural and ideological differences to the glorious truth that we are all children of our Heavenly Father. - Patrick Kearon, “Refuge from the Storm,” Ensign (CR) May 2016


5/9/16
The Savior lovingly acknowledged the widow whose contribution was only two mites because she did what she could. He also told the parable of the good Samaritan, which He concluded saying, “Go, and do thou likewise.” Sometimes reaching out is inconvenient. But when we work together in love and unity, we can expect heaven’s help. - Linda K. Burton, “I Was a Stranger,” Ensign (CR) May 2016


 
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